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Tuesday
Jul242007

Wristwatch of the Future as Crimefighter (1979)

The 1979 book Future Cities: Homes and Living into the 21st Century goes into some detail about how the "risto" may be used in a variety of applications. Aside from instantly voting via your watch the device apparently has crime-fighting capabilities.


Crime in cities could get a knock from the risto. Police would all be equipped with ristos, making equipment in patrol cars unnecessary. Conversations would be "scrambled" so they could not be overheard and in an emergency, police ristos would have priority over other. In the picture above two thieves have just stolen a car - its owner presses the emergency button on his risto to get help quickly. Emergency calls could be free, though computers would add up the price of other ones.


See also:
Ristos (1979)

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    Very good page, Stick to the wonderful job. Appreciate it.

Reader Comments (5)

I recall that section. It's remarkable that they correctly predict that police communications equipment will migrate from the car to the officer (in the UK, an officer will these days typically carry a GSM/UMTS phone as well as a TETRA one) that emergency calls would be free (OK, they always were), that they would have higher priority than ordinary calls (it's in the 3GPP spec) and that computers would add up the cost of other calls - billing! CDRs were not so commin in 1979. Pity they missed the miracle of prepaid.

July 24, 2007 | Unregistered CommenterPaul M. Cray

I loved that whole series of books, I got them as a young shool child and I must have read over each one several hundred times. Very well done.

July 24, 2007 | Unregistered CommenterAdam Ruth

I have one of http://www.expansys.com/p.aspx?i=141654&partner=adwords&gclid=CJG7mqW32Y0CFQIwlAod8QJ3YA" REL="nofollow">these, which while not quite a 'risto' does at least tell me the name of the person ringing my phone, notify me when I have new email/SMS and allow me to silence/reject incoming calls (plus play/pause my music and advance to the next track)...

August 3, 2007 | Unregistered CommenterGridlock

Geez, wouldn't those antennas stab you in the wrist and give you carpal tunnel syndrome?

August 11, 2007 | Unregistered CommenterScott

The US Army Natick Soldier Center already has prototype load-bearing-vests (for combat) that have rugged antennas built in, which can be connected to one's radio -- such as an MBTIR -- thus providing a very large antenna coiled around one's torso area. They are too costly, except for use by very high end special ops forces.

May 11, 2009 | Unregistered CommenterJulian

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