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Entries in charleston gazette (4)

Sunday
Aug092009

200 Years Old in 2000 A.D. (1926)

The January 2, 1926 Charleston Gazette (Charleston, WV) ran this short blurb about the year 2000 and the fear that longer life spans might mean thousands of descendants. 

A serious scientist has glad news for all those that want to stick to this world, in spite of its troubles and worries. In the year 2000, says he, the average life will be 100 years, and many will live to be 200 years old.

That will interest birth control advocates, for something in the way of birth control would seem to be necessary in 2000 A.D.

A man and woman 200 years old might easily have thousands of descendants. Providence, however, doesn't let the trees grow into the heavens.

Previously on Paleo-Future:

Thursday
Jul022009

Medical Predictions for 1999 (1955)

Dr. Lowry H. McDaniel of Tyronza, Ark., was a very optimistic doctor, though his ideas were certainly in line with medical futurists' thinking of that era. The June 9, 1955 Charleston Gazette (Charleston, WV) lays out his vision of the year 1999, which includes a 150 year life span, a cancer vaccine, and the complete eradication of infectious disease. You can read his 10 predictions for the year 1999 below:

  1. A man 90 years old will be considered "young," a man of 135 "more mature" and there will be "a minimum of senility because the heavy cholesterol which determines the age of our arteries will be absent."
  2. "Our women, thanks to proper hormone medication, would stay young, beautiful and shapely indefinitely."
  3. The Salk killed-virus vaccine "which is doing a tremendous job now" will be replaced in a few years by a living modified virus vaccine.
  4. All human infectious disease, including rheumatic heart disease and venereal disease, will be eradicated.
  5. Cancer will be "successfully treated by a virus vaccine or radioactive compounds."
  6. The common cold and "even the more serious respiratory virus infections will be only a memory."
  7. "Even greater victories await the highly-trained surgeon" of the future. Eye surgeons will restore vision to today's hopeless cases.
  8. Synthetic foodstuff will bring an end forever to famine and starvation.
  9. Electronic devices will enable deaf mutes to "speak." Initial research is underway by the Radio Corporation of America.
  10. Insulin will be given in tablet form for the control of diabetes. Medical science will discover an "effective treatment" against the blood, heart and degenerative diseases of old age.

 

Previously on Paleo-Future:

Monday
May212007

After the War (1944)

Associated Press Woman's Editor Dorothy Roe included a poem in her 1944 article about the kitchen of the future. I found the article in the March 20, 1944 Charleston Gazette (Charleston, West Virginia) and the poem is transcribed below.

After the war . . .
We'll just a press a button for food or for drink,
For washing the dishes or cleaning the sink.
We'll ride in a rocket instead of a car.
And life will be streamlined . . .
After the war.

After reading the entire article, which we'll look at later this week, you can tell that Roe attempts to put the hopes of post-war America into perspective and let people know that we may not be headed for a push-button future after all.

See also:
1999 A.D. (1967)
Call a Serviceman (Chicago Tribune, 1959)
Something must be wrong with its radar eye! (Chicago Tribune, 1959)
Monsanto House of the Future (1957-1967)
'Summer Terrace' All Year Round (1960s)

Monday
Apr302007

Mammy vs. Robot (Charleston Gazette, 1937)


This Li'l Abner comic by Al Capp ran in the July 18, 1937 edition of the Charleston Gazette (Charleston, West Virginia).

See also:
Donald Duck's "Modern Inventions" (1937)
All's Fair at the Fair (1938)