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Entries in smithsonian (4)

Wednesday
Sep282011

The Paleofuture Blog is moving!

I started the Paleofuture blog in 2007 as part of a writing class I was taking at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. At the time I thought that I'd maybe keep it up for just a couple of months. Little did I realize that writing about the history of the future would become such a huge part of my life.

Today, it's with great pride that I can announce the little ol' Paleofuture blog is becoming a part of the Smithsonian family of blogs! The new web address is http://blogs.smithsonianmag.com/paleofuture/ and that's where you'll be able to find new blog posts. But don't worry, Paleofuture.com will remain intact, as an archive of the last five years and the place to find new episodes of Paleofuture.TV and new issues of Paleofuture Magazine.

The blog has a new Twitter feed @PaleofutureBlog but you can still find my personal Twitter account @paleofuture. The Facebook and Tumblr feeds are also great ways to stay on top of all the retrofuture goodness. You can still drop me a line at matt@paleofuture.com. 

I'm really excited about my new home at Smithsonian and I hope that you enjoy the new things in store for Paleofuture. 

 

Thanks for reading,

Matt

 

Tuesday
Jan292008

1908


Jim Rasenberger, author of America, 1908 wrote a fascinating piece for the January, 2008 issue of Smithsonian Magazine. As Rasenberger contends, in 1908 it seemed that anything was possible. An excerpt appears below. The illustration of a man with wireless telephone is from Harper's Weekly.

The year 1908 began at midnight when a 700-pound "electric ball" fell from the flagpole atop the New York Times building - the first-ever ball-drop in Times Square. It ended 366 days later (1908 was a leap year) with a nearly two-and-a-half-hour flight by Wilbur Wright, the longest ever made in an airplane. In the days between, the U.S. Navy's Great White Fleet sailed around the world, Adm. Robert Peary began his conquest of the North Pole, Dr. Frederick Cook reached the North Pole (or claimed to), six automobiles set out on a 20,000-mile race from New York City to Paris, and the Model T went into production at Henry Ford's plant in Detroit, Michigan.


See also:
All the Music of the Centuries (1908)
2008 Presidential Campaign (1908)
The Air-Ship or One Hundred Years Hence (1908)
Your Own Wireless Telephone (1910)

 

Monday
Jul022007

Pears Soap Flying Machine (1906)


This fanciful flying machine was used to sell Pears' Soap in the July, 1906 issue of the Atlantic Monthly Advertiser. This image can be found in the Smithsonian Institution Images Catalog.


See also:
Futuristic Air Travel (circa 1900)
Aerial Navigation Will Never Be Popular (1906)
Paleo-Future Wallpaper

Monday
Mar262007

Walt Disney Explaining the Carousel of Progress to General Electric (1964)

Disney produced attractions for many companies during the 1964/1965 New York World's Fair. One of these attractions was the Carousel of Progress for the General Electric Pavilion showing, "how life has changed through electrical energy." Below is a clip from a short promotional film Disney produced.

The film was not intended for the public but rather General Electric, who had not yet heard the featured song of the attraction, "There's a Great Big Beautiful Tomorrow."

 

 


Also, unconfirmed rumors are circulating that Carousel of Progress will be entering the Smithsonian in 2009 along with the Enchanted Tiki Room but you didn't hear it from me.

 

See also:
Monsanto House of the Future (1957-1967) 19 March 2007