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Entries in space tourism (7)

Sunday
Dec072008

Exploring Space (1958)


While The Complete Book of Space Travel was aimed at teen and pre-teen boys, the 1958 book Exploring Space was looking for a younger audience (still of boys, mind you, since we all know that lady-parts get confused with all that science and math).

Below are sample pages from the book, including one that some little tyke got after with a brown crayon.

While some scientists are trying to find out how to land rockets safely, others are learning what kinds of suits space travelers will need. They pump air out of a room, so it is like space. Men who are inside wear space suits to test them. The men breathe through a hose connected to an oxygen tank.

Next a man may test a space suit in a three-stage rocket. Perhaps he will pilot stage three after it breaks away and speeds into space. He will go too fast to feel the pull of gravity. His body will lose all its weight. He will float around the cabin, if he isn't strapped in place. Will the first space traveler like the ride? When he lands, he will tell us.

Other men will follow the first space traveler into space. They will test bigger and bigger rockets. And so scientists will learn how to build great big rocket ships. These ships will fly around the world in an hour.

In time, scientists will know how to build rocket ships that can carry people to the moon. After the moon, what next? Perhaps people will visit other worlds in the sky.

Perhaps when you are grown-up, rockets will be as common as airplanes are now. Then you and all your friends will be space travelers. Rockets away!

 

Previously on Paleo-Future:
Closer Than We Think! Space Coveralls (1960)
The Complete Book of Space Travel (1956)
Challenge of Outer Space (circa 1950s)
Man and the Moon (1955)
Space Suit (1956)
Rocket Ship (1956)

Sunday
Nov232008

Vacation at a Space Hotel (1982)


The The Kids' Whole Future Catalog really is a treasure trove of 1980's futurism. Today we have a letter from Jenny, writing her friend Susan about the amazing space hotel she's visiting in the year 2002. Having graduated high school in the year 2002, I'm a little disappointed that my graduation ceremony wasn't held at a space hotel, complete with space pool and the accompanying physics that go along with that.

April 16, 2002

 

Dear Susan,

We arrived at the space hotel yesterday, and the first thing I did was try out the swimming pool. It really is as much fun as everyone says, but the low gravity takes getting used to. Everything happens more slowly than usual - you feel as though you're part of a movie that's being show in slow motion. When you jump off the diving board, you can easily do two or three somersaults before you hit the water - and when you do go in, you leave a hole which takes a few seconds to fill up. The pool doesn't look anything like the ones on Earth. It's like an enormous barrel with water lining the inside. The barrel rotates very slowly, creating just enough force to keep the water pushed up against the sides. When you're in the pool, you can see water curving uphill and people swimming upside down overhead. As if that isn't strange enough, you can also see people floating through the air in the zero-g area at the center of the barrel. To get there, all you have to do is jump high off the diving board and flap your arms like wings. If you hold a paddle in each hand, it's easier to steer. I want to tell you about all the other things I've done, but there isn't time. I'll write again tomorrow.

Love, Jenny


Read more:
Vacations of the Future (1981)
Moon Tourism (1988)
Welcome to Moonbase (1987)
The Kids' Whole Future Catalog (1982)
Factories in Space (1982)
New Worlds to Radically Alter (1981)

 

Wednesday
May282008

Moon Tourism (1988)


This image of "moon tourists [discovering] the pleasures of this Moon beach," is from the 1988 book The Earth's Moon (Isaac Asimov's Library of the Universe).

Imagine seas on a terraformed Moon! By creating an atmosphere on the Moon, we could capture sunlight and turn the Moon into a celestial tourist trap. This would be fun, but many scientists feel it is more important to keep the Moon pretty much as it is. Then we could use it to help us better understand Earth and the cosmos.


See also:
Vacations of the Future (1981)
Welcome to Moonbase (1987)
New World's to Radically Alter (1981)

 

Wednesday
Jul112007

Spaceport of the Future (1957)


For those of you who haven't yet checked out Plan59, I highly recommend it. The site has some amazing images of the paleo-future such as this Spaceport of the Future, as well as other vintage ephemera.

I know I've seen this image somewhere but I can't place it. Any idea where this image was originally used? I almost want to say that it has a Ford Motor Company connection.

See also:
Space Colony Pirates (1981)
Mars and Beyond (1957)
Challenge of Outer Space (circa 1950s)
Welcome to Moonbase (1987)

Tuesday
May222007

Welcome to Moonbase (1987)


The 1987 book Welcome to Moonbase describes the "history" of colonizing the moon. The manual explains "lunar manufacturing," "job guidelines," and "lunar tourism," among other things. Stay tuned as we explore this fascinating book from the paleo-future.

See also:
Space Colony Pirates (1981)
Sport in Space Colonies (1977)
Space Colonies by Don Davis
More Space Colony Art (1970s)
Mars and Beyond (1957)
Challenge of Outer Space (circa 1950s)

Thursday
Apr192007

Predicts Conventions in Space by Year 2000 (Chicago Tribune, 1965)

The June 15, 1965 edition of the Chicago Tribune contained a great prediction from a Chicago real estate broker about the year 2000:

By the year 2000, business conventions will be held at interplanetary "cosmotels," to which most delegates will travel in their own family "volkscapsules" or "satellacs," Walter P. Kuehnle, a Chicago real estate broker said yesterday. He addressed the congress of 19-nation International Real Estate federation in Brussels, Belgium.

I'm interested in learning whether the imaginative terms above were the invention of Mr. Kuehnle. If he came up with the word "volkscapsules," I want to be his new best friend.

Tuesday
Mar132007

Dancing on the Moon (1935)

The 1935 Fleischer Brothers cartoon Dancing on the Moon gave audiences a peek at the wondrous age of space travel, still decades from becoming a reality. It is difficult to imagine the world of 1935, in the middle of the Great Depression, watching a cartoon like Dancing on the Moon with such optimism. I picture Cecilia, (Mia Farrow) in the Purple Rose of Cairo, escaping her unbearable life through the images on screen.

The experimental nature of using a combination of models and animation for Dancing on the Moon is the most strikingly original aspect of this cartoon classic. The space rockets of today are clearly different from those depicted in the short but the notion of space tourism, (an idea that's been around for quite some time), was clearly an exciting concept for the tired masses of 1935. Check out the short cartoon here.




See also:
All's Fair at the Fair (1938) 21 Feb 2007